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Aono Fumiaki
Born 1968 in Miyagi prefecture (Japan), based in Miyagi prefecture.
Aono has exhibited at venues including the Rias Ark Museum of Art and the Miyagi Museum of Art. In the 1990s he began working with objects washed up on the coastline and other fragments of ‘broken’ items found in many different places, using them as the base for creating his own works by making additions in a process he considers to be mending or restoring. However, Aono does not restore the items to their original state so that they can be used again. Rather, the ‘restoration’ process transforms each item into an object that cannot be used. In more recent works, the additions have sometimes resulted in hybrid or composite objects. Aono was directly impacted by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, and he has subsequently worked with debris, including items from his own neighborhood, the homes of relatives, and familiar places, adopting a variety of approaches in an attempt to add in what is missing from these items and seek out the form that the recycled objects should take. However, rather than recycling that results in something useful for a different purpose, he is still creating something that does not function. The earthquake, a major historical event, changed the significance of Aono’s works, despite continuing to work post-earthquake in the same way that he did pre-earthquake.

Aono Fumiaki

Born 1968 in Miyagi prefecture (Japan), based in Miyagi prefecture.

Aono has exhibited at venues including the Rias Ark Museum of Art and the Miyagi Museum of Art. In the 1990s he began working with objects washed up on the coastline and other fragments of ‘broken’ items found in many different places, using them as the base for creating his own works by making additions in a process he considers to be mending or restoring. However, Aono does not restore the items to their original state so that they can be used again. Rather, the ‘restoration’ process transforms each item into an object that cannot be used. In more recent works, the additions have sometimes resulted in hybrid or composite objects. Aono was directly impacted by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and tsunami, and he has subsequently worked with debris, including items from his own neighborhood, the homes of relatives, and familiar places, adopting a variety of approaches in an attempt to add in what is missing from these items and seek out the form that the recycled objects should take. However, rather than recycling that results in something useful for a different purpose, he is still creating something that does not function. The earthquake, a major historical event, changed the significance of Aono’s works, despite continuing to work post-earthquake in the same way that he did pre-earthquake.

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    Aono Fumiaki Born 1968 in Miyagi prefecture (Japan), based in Miyagi prefecture. Aono has exhibited at venues including...
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